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Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Diagnosis and management of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism found in the catalog.

Diagnosis and management of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism

Karen Patrias

Diagnosis and management of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism

January 1986 through September 1990, 1057 citations

by Karen Patrias

  • 106 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, Reference Section, Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O. [distributor in Bethesda, Md, Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hyperparathyroidism -- Bibliography.,
  • Hypercalcemia -- Bibliography.,
  • Hyperparathyroidism.,
  • Parathyroid Neoplasms.,
  • Neoplasms, Multiple Endocrine.,
  • Adenoma.

  • Edition Notes

    Shipping list no.: 90-685-P.

    Statementprepared by Karen Patrias and Judith E. Fradkin.
    GenreBibliography.
    SeriesCurrent bibliographies in medicine -- no. 90-11
    ContributionsFradkin, Judith E., National Library of Medicine (U.S.). Reference Section
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvii, 49 p. ;
    Number of Pages49
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22413220M

    People with primary hyperparathyroidism due to familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia should not have surgery. 4 Udelsman R, Pasieka JL, Sturgeon C, Young JEM, and Clark OH. Surgery for asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism: proceedings of the Third International Workshop. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. ;94(2)–   Introduction: Primary hyperparathyroidism is increasingly an asymptomatic disease at diagnosis, but the recognized guidelines for management are based on evidence obtained from studies on patients with symptomatic disease, and surgery is not always indicated. Other patients are unable to undergo surgery, and thus a medical treatment is by:

    "Diagnosis and Management of Asymptomatic Primary Hyperparathyroidism: Consensus Development Conference Statement," Annals of Internal Medicine Vol. , No. 7, April 1, Reprints are also available from the Office of Medical Applications of Research (OMAR) Consensus Program Clearinghouse, P.O. Box , Kensington, MD Primary hyperparathyroidism occurs when your parathyroid glands produce too much PTH. A variety of conditions can result in hyperparathyroidism, such as the following.

    Introduction. Hyperparathyroidism (HPT) is a condition in which the parathyroid glands produce too much of their parathyroid hormone (PTH). In primary HPT, this overproduction is in most cases caused by a single hyperplastic adenoma. 1 In contrast, secondary HPT and tertiary HPT are defined by parathyroid hormonal disturbances caused by an external : Willemijn Y. van der Plas, Liffert Vogt, Schelto Kruijff. Vitamin D deficiency exacerbates primary hyperparathyroidism and vice versa. With care, vitamin D supplementation can safely be given to selected patients with asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism and is suggested before deciding on medical or surgical management.


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Diagnosis and management of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism by Karen Patrias Download PDF EPUB FB2

Introduction. Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common disease which affects –2% of populations, with a female preponderance.1 The clinical presentation of PHPT has changed dramatically over the past 30 years from a symptomatic disorder associated with severe hypercalcaemia, renal stones and bone disease to a condition that is often asymptomatic, which is Cited by:   Objective: Asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common clinical problem.

The purpose of this report is to guide the use of diagnostics and management for this condition in clinical practice. Participants: Interested professional societies selected representatives for the consensus committee and provided funding for a one-day meeting. A subgroup of this committee set Cited by:   Other issues related to medical management, surveillance, and criteria for diagnosis and/or recommendations for surgery all led to the convening of a Consensus Development Conference on the Management of Asymptomatic Primary Hyperparathyroidism.

This conference, held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Octoberwas sponsored by Cited by: Diagnosis and Management of Asymptomatic Diagnosis and management of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism book Hyperparathyroidism.

National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference Statement OctoberThis statement is more than five years old and is provided solely for historical purposes.

Parathyroidectomy in asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism: improves "bones" but not "psychic moans". J Clin Endocrinol Metab ; Talpos GB, Bone HG 3rd, Kleerekoper M, et al.

Randomized trial of parathyroidectomy in mild asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism: patient description and effects on the SF health survey. Primary hyperparathyroidism is the most common cause of hypercalcaemia in the ambulatory setting.1 2 Although this condition can occur at any age, it commonly affects people over the age of 50 years and postmenopausal women.2 3 Over the past few decades it has changed from being a condition usually defined by its symptoms to one that is often discovered on routine screening tests Cited by: Get this from a library.

Diagnosis and management of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism. [National Institutes of Health (U.S.);]. The diagnosis and management of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism. Nat Clin Pract Endocrinol Metab. ; 2(9) Nat Clin Pract Endocrinol Metab.

; 2(9) Wermers RA, Khosla S, Atkinson EJ, et al. Incidence of primary hyperparathyroidism in Rochester, Minnesota, an update on the changing epidemiology of the. Primary hyperparathyroidism: review and recommendations on evaluation, diagnosis, and management. A Canadian and international consensus external link opens in a new window.

The American Association of Endocrine Surgeons guidelines for definitive management of primary hyperparathyroidism external link opens in a new window. More guidelines.

Diagnosis of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism: proceedings of the Fourth International Workshop. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. ; Silverberg SJ, Clarke BL, Peacock M, et al. Current issues in the presentation of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism: proceedings of the Fourth International Workshop.

National Institutes of Health. Consensus conference. Diagnosis and management of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism. Conn Med. Jun. 55(6) [Guideline] Bilezikian JP, Khan AA, Potts JT. Guidelines for the management of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism: summary statement from the third international workshop.

The diagnosis and management of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism Article Literature Review in Nature Clinical Practice Endocrinology & Metabolism 2(9) October with Get this from a library. Diagnosis and management of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism: January through September citations.

[Karen Patrias; Judith E Fradkin; National Library of Medicine (U.S.). Reference Section.]. Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Hyperparathyroidism FIGURE 2. Algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism (PTH = parathyroid hormone; 1,25(OH) 2D 3 = 1,25 File Size: KB.

Figure 1 Diagnosis and management of primary hyperparathyroidism: decisional flow chart from a geriatric perspective. PTH, para- thyroid hormone; 25(OH)D, hydroxyvitamin D.

Diagnosis occurs through testing for a concurrent elevated serum calcium level with a raised or inappropriately normal (i.e., non-suppressed) plasma PTH level. Wilhelm SM, Wang TS, Ruan DT, et al.

The American Association of Endocrine Surgeons guidelines for definitive management of primary hyperparathyroidism. Evaluating Patients for Asymptomatic Primary Hyperparathyroidism The Fourth International Workshop on Asymptomatic Primary Hyperparathyroidism, which convened inrecommended several evaluations to broadly assess the severity of PHPT presentation and pr ovide insight on when to consider parathyroidectomy Clinical Presentation (cont.

Source: Adapted from Bilezikian JP, et al. "Guidelines for the management of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism: Summary statement from the Third International Workshop," Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (Feb.

), Vol. 94, No. 2, pp. – Primary hyperparathyroidism is usually caused by a tumor within the parathyroid gland. The symptoms of the condition relate to the elevated calcium levels, which can cause digestive symptoms, kidney stones, psychiatric abnormalities, and bone disease.

The diagnosis is initially made on blood tests; an elevated level of calcium together with a raised level of parathyroid hormone are typically Specialty: Endocrinology.

With the use of routine calcium screening in Western countries, the clinical profile of primary hyperparathyroidism has shifted from a symptomatic disease, to one with subtle or no specific symptoms (“asymptomatic” primary hyperparathyroidism).

The symptomatic variant is still predominant in the developing world (3). Abstract. Nowadays, the diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) is more precocious if compared to the past. It makes it possible to identify patients with few symptoms, regardless of the clinical features generally represented by the later disease by: 1.Diagnosis and management of primary hyperparathyroidism – A scientific presentation is variable the asymptomatic hypercalce-mia form, detected by routine screening, is the most common (50% to 80%)(2).

However, the presentation Diagnosis and management of primary hyperparathyroidism.Claudio Marcocci, Filomena Cetani, in Encyclopedia of Endocrine Diseases (Second Edition), Abstract.

Primary hyperparathyroidism is the third most common endocrine disorder and most common cause of hypercalcemia in the general population.

Diagnosis based on confirmed hypercalcemia [total calcium (albumin corrected) or ionized calcium] associated with elevated or inappropriately normal.